Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips Vintage | Tailor’s Slip Stitch | Hidden Buttoning | Pages 30 to 39

Tonight, there’s another glitch with E Bay’s listing form, so I decided to add more from the Spadea’s collection of sewing tips, here’s pages 30 to 39.

Hidden Buttoning – Many innovative styling techniques were innovations by Mr. Tiffeau’s, one of the most popular was the hidden button closure, giving a fluid unbroken look, which gives no hint of the button closure beneath. In his 1960’s collection, he used this closing in his loosely fitted jacket of a two piece dress made of flannel. Spadea’s N-1288 Two Piece Dress from the Vintage Pattern Wiki is an example of the technique.

Hidden Buttoning | Spadea

Hidden Buttoning | Spadea

Hidden Buttoning Continued

Hidden Buttoning Continued

would you like to see more of Tiffeau’s designs, check out Reading Vintage Vogue, on my birthday in 2003, the New York time sprinted an article call “The Hustler” which I think gives a great summary of how Tiffeau influenced the fashion industry.

Decisions Decisions Decisions - Sleeves

Decisions Decisions Decisions – Sleeves

Detachable Sleeves not a new idea, but how to do it? Well that might have escaped the knowledge base of the average seamstress including me.

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland

Facing the Facings – This tip isn’t just about facing it’s about flawless finishing techniques. If you have the chance to use this technique or have used a similar finishing, please share a pictures with our growing community.

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland Continued

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland Continued

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland Continued

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland Continued

The Tailor’s Slip Stitch – a sign of couture is your skill at hand stitching and your finishes, this is a hem technique worth learning to do. In the modern-day, most machines give similar hem stitch, but I think taking the time to practice and learn this technique is well worth the effort.

Tailor's Slip Stitch

Tailor’s Slip Stitch

Cover-up for A Collar

Cover-up for a Collar

Cover-up for a Collar

Cover a Collar Continued

Cover a Collar Continued

Sizing Up a Button

Sizing Up a Button

Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips Vintage |Dust and Cut | The Golden Chain | Pages 18 to 29

Dust and Cut –marking and cutting out your pattern is the most time-consuming and tedious task, here’s an interesting idea from the workrooms of Shannon Rodgers.

Duct and Cut

Dust and Cut

A Pressing Matter – pressing not ironing is one of the most important task in the dressmaking process, if you want a professional looking finished piece, this is one step that you can always improve upon. According to Madame Biki any fabric having a specific nap or pile, such as velvet, or any embossed fabric having a raised design such as matelasse or cloque, could not be pressed. The fabric with the pile surface would become matted and the embossed fabric would lose its character pattern or volume. A system has been found whereby the fabric returns to its original freshness even after lengthy handling have you ever used a velvet board? They are still expensive but worth the investment. Instead use a double layer of thick terry surface towels placed over the ironing board instead.

A Pressing Matter

A Pressing Matter

How to Handle a Delicate Drifter

How to Handle a Delicate Drifter

How to Handle A Delicate Drifter – Modern techniques have helped to lessen the trouble with handling and sewing these mysterious slinky fabrics as they slip and slither when you’re working with them. Jo Copeland has a bit of magical know-how from her workrooms. Here’s a little tip that you learn early on, try to have a surface large enough to accommodate the fabric width and length. Use a roll of tissue paper to underlay the fabric. If the paper isn’t wide enough, pin or scotch tape two or more widths together. You stitch right through the paper and fabric.

How to Handle a Delicate Drifter Continued

How to Handle a Delicate Drifter Continued

The Golden Chain – To keep the perfect hang of your suit jacket, designer Bill Blass uses a wonderful golden chain. You don’t have to use a gold chain but whatever metal you decide to use make sure it will stand the test of time. The chain makes a wonderful finishing touch that is not only practical but it’s decorative as well. By the way, check our a wonderful video on making the Chanel little black jacket which uses this same technique. Suit jackets, especially those made from woven fabrics will shag over time if this method is not used. The chain acts as a gentle weight and importantly keeps the weight evenly distributed along the entire lower edge of the jacket.

The Golden Chain

The Golden Chain

The Golden Chain Continued

The Golden Chain Continued

Why An Underlining? While each step in the dressmaking process is important, based on my experience I think the pressing and choosing the right underlining and interfacing is of the utmost importance. A wide and confusing choice of fabrics are available for underlining and each serves a definite purpose. How can you know which kind to choose, first read Understanding Underlining.

Be sure to understand that underlining and lining a garment is two different processes. I suggest that you read Underlining Vs Interfacing.

Anthony Blotta gives some help and aid in your choice. For loosely woven, knitted or soft woolen fabrics, the underlining is used for shape retention. To define molded contours or shape bouffants. Read more about underlining…

Why an Underlining | Anthony Blotta

Why an Underlining | Anthony Blotta

A Fitting Shortcut – One of the most important things you’ll want to carry out a flawless fit. Vincent Monte Sano suggests that you should always make a trail copy to test the fit of a garment.

Vincent Monte Sano | Fitting Shortcuts

Vincent Monte Sano | Fitting Shortcuts

Tips for Interfacing – the tips discussed in this book by Monte Sano and Pruzan will help you to cut the bulk of interfacing. in one example using their suggested method reduces the bulk when working with darts becomes immediately clear. Remember usually, you can’t find the correct type of interfacing in your typical fabric store, use the link resource below to understand and indulge in the finer more upscale materials for your project.

Make the Most of Exceptional Interfacing and How to Interface Jackets: Lessons from a Yves Saint Laurent Garment.

The first article especially provides insight and resources for purchasing these linings because they do make a big difference in how your finished piece will look.

Tips for Interfacings

Tips for interfacing

Tips for Interfacings continued | Monte Sano | Pruzan

Tips for Interfacing continued | Monte Sano | Pruzan

The Iron-On Fabric | Today’s Fusible Interfacing – Biki of Milan claimed that it could be used as a wonderful shortcut for stiffening extensive areas and to give a better value and new weight to certain fabrics, especially those used in making suits and coats.

Biki was correct in some cases fusible interfacing is used as underlining giving your garment a sculpted look, I hope this handy Chart of Fusible and Sew-in Interfacing is helpful.

The Iron On Fabrics

The Iron On Fabrics

The Iron On Fabrics Continued

The Iron On Fabrics Continued

I thought you might like this next article because the project allows you will use many of these techniques to complete the Jacket.

The 70 Hour classic French Jacket

Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips Vintage 1960s | Joset Walker | Shannon Rodgers | Jerry Silverman

Designer Biographies

Designer Bio Shannon Roger | Joset Walker

Bio Shannon Roger | Joset Walker

Shannon Rodger and his partner Jerry Silverman have joined together to and became one of the raging successes of the American fashion industry in the 1960’s. Their showroom was a constant whirlwind of activity as buyers eagerly sought to make their purchases. They truly snared the fancy of the astute young moderns who recognized good design and good quality at prices they could afford.

Joset Walker is one of America’s outstanding designers of sportswear. her French origin makes her a stickler for fine tailoring as well as for chic. Here in this book she shares some of her sewing knowledge to help women become more efficient in their ventures. Here a Flicker page with lots of beautiful images of Joset’s designs.

Here’s couple of her sportswear designs.

Dorian Leigh in Swimwear by Joset WalkerJoset Walker Design

A collection of Sewing Tips Sapdea09072013_00005 - Copy

Jacques Tiffeau was the first American designer to raise hemlines to mini length.   Tiffeau and Busch are a team of high style fashion designers who have reached the top at a very young age. with their youth they have pioneered many new sewing gadgets and techniques. In this book you’ll discovery some of the innovations.

Here’s a great biography for Tiffeau you might enjoy and a few images.

Vincent Monte Sano and Pruzan top names in the American coat and suit market are known for their superb soft tailoring, styling and exclusive imported fabrics. their clothes are in the luxury class with prices at the time starting at $300 retail. In this publication they reveal custom tailoring secrets so women who sew could have greater success.

Jo Copeland and Anthony Blotta

Jo Copeland and Anthony Blotta

Jo Copeland one of America’s top names in high fashion she has been the darling of the chic women of Park and Fifth Avenues, who love feminine clothes. Here in this book she shares some of her sewing secrets so that women who make their own clothes could become better dresses than ever. Here’s more about Jo and her rise through the ranks of Fashion Design. Here’s a link over to a wonderful Pinterest page for Jo Copeland. I just love this Copeland Dress.

There no much information out there about Anthony Blotta the Vintage Pattern Wiki was a good source. Anthony Blotta is a master Tailor in the true sense of the word. His exquisitely constructed, hand finished clothes reflect his exacting standards. They are created for women who recognize and can afford the best. Here, he shares his couture know how.

Blotta began his fashion house in 1919, he became known for his work in wool, especially his suits and coats, and evening wear. He worked within the silhouettes of current fashion, but often with a softer edge. Blotta remained in business into the 1960’s. As I stated there’s not Anthony his work but here’a a link to a Gallery of Anthony Blotta’s work. By chance, if you know about more information, please share the link.

Biki of Milan | Irene Gilbert

Biki of Milan | Irene Gilbert

Puccini and Elvira became grandparents when Fosca and Salvatore Leonardi had their first child, Franca. In 1905 a second daughter followed. she was called “Little Elvira” and was the baby Puccini adored. when she grew up, Little Elvira Leonardi became the famous Milanese fashion designer “Biki of Milan”,  who reigned supreme in her atelier and whose clients included Milanese noblewomen, film stars, Maria Callas, and Toscanini’s daughters and granddaughters. If you’d like to read more about Biki check out this free book on Google Books.

Our Next Post will begin With exploring methods used by designers to mark fabric..Until next time.

Irene Gilbert of Dublin is the leading Irish couture designer of her era. Despite the competition from Paris and Italy her pattern designs have outsold others for amny seasons. this is a reflection of her creative ability. Her styling and workmanship are superb. Checkout this wonderful Irish Photo gallery.

Bill Blass | David Goodstein

Bill Blass | David Goodstein

Bill Blass. award winner for his septacularly chic and femininr clothes is now a seasoned star in the fashion designing world. He is one of the new group of American designers to emerge. he combines the traditional and the novel to create some of the greatest American clothes. Blass began his New York fashion career in 1945. He was a protégé of Baron de Gunzburg In 1970, after two decades of success in menswear and womenswear, he bought Maurice Rentner Ltd., which he had joined in 1959, and renamed it Bill Blass Limited. Over the next 30 years he expanded his line to include swimwear, furs, luggage, perfume, and chocolate. By 1998, his company had grown to a $700-million-a-year business.

David Goodstein was the king in the realm of casual sportswear as written by the St. Petersburg Times, a title he held through many successful seasons through many years The pattern shown in the St. Petersburg Times, May 23, 1954 is one of the powers behind his throne for it  has everything a casual ensemble should have, charm. detail, enhancing silhouette and a special air of its own.