Vintage Collection of Designer Couture Sewing Tips By Spadea Pattern Company | All Pages Posted

Thank you all for following this series of post about 60’s designer sewing tips by a little known pattern company call Spadea, you can find more about this company’s history here at Fuzzy Lizzie.

The Vintage Traveler took the leap and actually contacted the mother Anne Spadea Combs, and it sounds like a really informative conversation, I think you’ll enjoy it check it out. Take special note that the Duchess of Windsor Collection for really for the Duchesses and that relationship lasted over ten years.

Earlier in this series, I spotlighted the Designer’s featured in this book you can find those post here

But there were other as outlined here;

Alan Graham, Anne Fogarty, Brigance, Ceil Chapman, Charles LaMaire, Charles Montaigne, Dinah Shore, Eguzquiza, Fontana, Harvey Berin, Herbert Sondheim, Lachasse, Leo Narducci, Tina Leser, Mollie Parnis, Nancy Layton, Norman Hartnell,Roberto Capucci, Simonetta, Veneziani, Vera Maxwell. I will outline a few below.

According to the Vintage Pattern Wiki Alan Graham created about ten designs for Spadea, unfortunately I could not find a Biography for Alan.

Anne Fogarty was part of the American Designer Series by Spadea. Wikipedia published an extensive bio, but if you want to see images, check out Fuzzy Lizzie once again provides a nice history and some really nice eye candy to boot. You might want to check out “The Well Dressed Wife” it would make a splendid addition library.

I would now like to focus on Tom Brigance relationship with the pattern publisher, it looks like he created about 12 designs which are illustrated noted on the Vintage Pattern Wiki. Pinterest provides a Gallery of designs by the iconic fashion designer. also checkout Couture Allure for one of his most desirable designs — you’ll find is still in demand today.

Ceil Chapman is another contributor to these classic styles you can see more of those designs at the Selfish Seamstress and a bit of background, Squidoo is also one of my favorite places checkout this wonderful lens on the designs at classic Vintage Old Hollywood Style .

According to what information I could find Charles LaMaire, was a prolific costume designer for some very famous movies such as All About Eve staring my favorite actress Betty Davis. I could talk all day–but check out his works here on Pinterest.

The book Designer Sewing Tips By Spadea Pattern Company is a gold mind of tips and techniques and my copy is securely in my sewing library, but I love to share and you can find every page at my Free Vintage Patterns Dazespast, soon each tip will cataloged by page so enjoy!

The cover image Hat is by my up and coming designer friend Mary over at MaryGwyneth Designs or her Facebook Page.

You can find other articles about the Spadea Sewing techniques by following these links.

Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips Vintage 1960s

Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips Vintage | Pages 18 to 29

Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips Vintage | Pages 40 to 53

Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips Vintage | Pages 54 to 77 | Pockets to Collar Magic

I’ve written nothing at all about my love of fashion dolls–the dolls are amazing but the doll-sized couture is what makes me go Wow! stay tunes for the best of the best in everything that dresses and furnishes today’s dolls all with a vintage flare.

That’s all for now.

Peace!

Ruby

 

Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips Vintage | Tailor’s Slip Stitch | Hidden Buttoning | Pages 30 to 39

Tonight, there’s another glitch with E Bay’s listing form, so I decided to add more from the Spadea’s collection of sewing tips, here’s pages 30 to 39.

Hidden Buttoning – Many innovative styling techniques were innovations by Mr. Tiffeau’s, one of the most popular was the hidden button closure, giving a fluid unbroken look, which gives no hint of the button closure beneath. In his 1960’s collection, he used this closing in his loosely fitted jacket of a two piece dress made of flannel. Spadea’s N-1288 Two Piece Dress from the Vintage Pattern Wiki is an example of the technique.

Hidden Buttoning | Spadea

Hidden Buttoning | Spadea

Hidden Buttoning Continued

Hidden Buttoning Continued

would you like to see more of Tiffeau’s designs, check out Reading Vintage Vogue, on my birthday in 2003, the New York time sprinted an article call “The Hustler” which I think gives a great summary of how Tiffeau influenced the fashion industry.

Decisions Decisions Decisions - Sleeves

Decisions Decisions Decisions – Sleeves

Detachable Sleeves not a new idea, but how to do it? Well that might have escaped the knowledge base of the average seamstress including me.

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland

Facing the Facings – This tip isn’t just about facing it’s about flawless finishing techniques. If you have the chance to use this technique or have used a similar finishing, please share a pictures with our growing community.

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland Continued

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland Continued

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland Continued

Face the Facing | Jo Copeland Continued

The Tailor’s Slip Stitch – a sign of couture is your skill at hand stitching and your finishes, this is a hem technique worth learning to do. In the modern-day, most machines give similar hem stitch, but I think taking the time to practice and learn this technique is well worth the effort.

Tailor's Slip Stitch

Tailor’s Slip Stitch

Cover-up for A Collar

Cover-up for a Collar

Cover-up for a Collar

Cover a Collar Continued

Cover a Collar Continued

Sizing Up a Button

Sizing Up a Button

Couture Sewing Techniques | The Art of Sewing Part 1

Discovering Couture Sewing Techniques

It’s been two weeks since my last blog post, during that time away my hard drive failed and I couldn’t think of anything interesting to write about–primarily because I am worried about my data being lost. I didn’t want to just list patterns with “press this”, that’s not interesting and it wouldn’t give you my readers a reason to check in..

I decided on combining two of my passions, the first being my love of dramatic detail on relatively simple pieces as shown in this post titled Vintage Sewing Pattern Fashion Trim Detail a few weeks back with my passion for fine sewing techniques.

The art of couture sewing is slow sewing–these are not quick or simple but they are works of art if executed properly.

Since I really needed to replace my sewing bookmarks, I decided to share the websites and resources that I found interesting.

First I would like to recommend the  www.vpl.orgVintage Pattern Lending Library, it’s well worth the membership. It is a great source for vintage patterns reproductions from the 1860s through the 1950s. If you venture into the world of period reenactment and costuming, it’s also a fine place to checkout.

NextA French needlepoint lace with a floral design. here’s  Alencon Lace Sample a few of my favorite sewing related websites; Sew Country Chick, and her tutorial on “Making Alencon Lace Seams

Sewaholic is next on the list, I especially like her Sewtionary, Couture Bound Buttonhole I think that’s a new word, this page is a visual encyclopedia or dictionary of hand sewing techniques. Here’s a tutorial on making Bound Buttonholes. In her post ‘A little vacation reading: Couture Sewing Techniques”, her definition of couture sewing is spot on.

Welt Pocket

Welt Pocket

Are you intimidated by Welt Pockets,  here’s a crash course with step-by-step images to guide you through the process. LLadybird took plenty of pictures and provides a really good step by step–remember measure, mark and cut only after measuring and marking once again.

There are many other techniques that include hand stitching, quilting, lining, underlining, rolled lapels and much more, so I will end part one of this series with links to what I think is a great blog for advanced sewing tutorials.

Checkout Frabjous Couture, the tutorial is for a Boucle Chanel Jacket with a silk charmeuse lining quilted to support the shape of the jacket because boucle has a tendency to stretch our of shape and you end-up with the lining hanging below the hemlines. This is a three-part tutorial.

Part 1: Boucle Charmeuse and Quiltiing a la Chanel

Part 2: Boucle Charmeuse and Quiltiing a la Chanel

Part 3: Boucle Charmeuse and Quiltiing a la Chanel

Inside the Chanel Jacket

Inside the Chanel Jacket

“Inside the Chanel Jacket”, first appeared in Threads magazine in the October/November issue 2005, number 121, pp. 34-40.

Tell me what are your most challenging sewing technique? Part 2 will cover hand sewing techniques.